Washer´s Parabolas, 2017

Materials: clothesline, bricklayers string, nails, wood lath and paint.

Pia Männikkö: Washer´s Parabolas, 2017

I studied geometric patterns that I remember from childhood. English self-taught mathematician, Mary Everest Boole (born 1832), developed teaching methods to encourage children to explore mathematics through playful activities, such as curve stitching. Those patterns started to spread as home decoration in 1960s, mathematical forms were made with strings and nails on wood boards. In 1980s DIY string art instructions spread also to North-Finland, where I grew up. I remember the intriguing patterns from my grandmothers house. I got an opportunity to make an outdoor work in old wall paper factory ruins in Akaa, southern Finland. I made a version of Boole´s patterns, using also the structures and objects of the ruins. Washer´s parabolas was part of Näkymä environmental exhibition.

Pia Männikkö: Washer´s Parabolas, 2017

Pia Männikkö: Washer´s Parabolas, 2017

Pia Männikkö: Washer´s Parabolas, 2017

Hameen_sanomat_07_07_2017_kansi_S2

 

 

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